You are hereDepartments > Geography  > Past Geography Students   |  Login
 Past Pupils

OUR PAST PUPILS:

Wills McNeilly

My time studying Geography at Shimna was not only worthwhile but also very enjoyable. The topics studied at GCSE and A-level are wide ranging with a result that there was always something of personal interest to me that we were studying. Case studies were a great way in which we looked at real examples, rather than just learning facts you began to build up a story which made it more relevant and engrossing as a subject.

 

As a ‘Geographer’ at Shimna you are given the chance to become involved in many of the environmental issues in our area. One way is through the Geography conferences held locally in which you and your class have an environmental issue that you defend and argue for, amongst other Geography students in the area. In such conferences you are also given insight by professionals in the field on the latest issues that affect the Mourne area, as well as Ireland as a whole. For example, did you know it is believed that the coast is just going through a natural cycle and predictions have it that Newcastle will once again have sand instead of rocks on its beach in the future? Through such conferences, class discussions and the hands on fieldwork on the Shimna River and at Murlough nature reserve, you become aware of the environment around you.

 

To know how the world around you works is a skill you really come to appreciate, how a river flows, how the seas were formed, how some people live in poverty while others live in wealth. Geography doesn’t only help you appreciate your local environment but it also makes other countries familiar to you rather than just being ‘those other people over there,’ which is important in an Integrated school like Shimna.

 

In my first semester studying Archaeology at Queen’s a background in Geography has been very useful, having an understanding of the modern world makes it easier to compare with the world in the past. Just a couple of weeks ago we had a tutorial where we discussed settlement patterns for prehistoric people in Europe and we spend half an hour talking about Christaller’s Central Place Theory which is a Geography topic through and through. It seems that Geography is a relevant subject for whatever you choose to do and if you are starting to make choices for GCSE or A-level it is really worth thinking of Geography as one of your options.

 

 

 

Phillip Crookes 

 

I studied Geography at Shimna College for 7 years, and it is a subject that provided me with many different experiences and topics which I enjoyed. When I started Shimna, back in Year 8, I had a keen interest in Geography but it was not until Year 10 when choosing my GCSE’s that my interest was sparked further by the numerous, exciting topics that I would be able to study at GCSE. The more I studied something in detail, the more interesting it became.

 

As a person who frequently asks “Why?” about many things, I felt Geography was a subject that, in a way, spoke to me as it explained how and why things happened around the world. Geography is a subject that is current, it’s in the present. We look around the world and we see natural disasters happening, governments focusing more and more on cutting CO2 emissions and becoming sustainable, rising and falling birth rates, and even what the weather is like just outside our doors. Geography gives answers to why these things happen, and what exactly these things are. It also helps us understand what is happening in the world and how it is changing.

 

In Year 8, we each were given an EU country to research and then present to the class. As somebody who loves finding out about other cultures, this project appealed to me and opened my eyes as to how different modern day Europe is.

 

At GCSE, the two words that spring to mind are: case study. The case studies allowed us to focus on a particular area of a country or even just a particular country, and understand the environmental processes in the area, or the human factors affecting the area such as its population. Although those two words used to strike fear in me, I now look back on them positively as effective ways of understanding and discovering the world. To this day I can still rhyme off the facts and figures of the Kobe earthquake in Japan.

 

A subject which usually gets classes particularly interested is The Dynamic Earth (Volcanoes & Earthquakes), a topic which we studied at GCSE and went on to study in more detail at A-Level. I think the reason many find this topic so interesting is that it piques people’s curiosity so they want to find out more about natural disasters. Most of us would not have experienced these natural disasters; therefore our A2 class got very excited over this particular topic (as well as studying Curitiba in another topic). We were very keen to start learning about volcanoes and earthquakes in more detail, with most of us citing that topic as the reason for wanting to continue to study Geography.

 

OUR PAST PUPILS:

Wills McNeilly

My time studying Geography at Shimna was not only worthwhile but also very enjoyable. The topics studied at GCSE and A-level are wide ranging with a result that there was always something of personal interest to me that we were studying. Case studies were a great way in which we looked at real examples, rather than just learning facts you began to build up a story which made it more relevant and engrossing as a subject.

 

As a ‘Geographer’ at Shimna you are given the chance to become involved in many of the environmental issues in our area. One way is through the Geography conferences held locally in which you and your class have an environmental issue that you defend and argue for, amongst other Geography students in the area. In such conferences you are also given insight by professionals in the field on the latest issues that affect the Mourne area, as well as Ireland as a whole. For example, did you know it is believed that the coast is just going through a natural cycle and predictions have it that Newcastle will once again have sand instead of rocks on its beach in the future? Through such conferences, class discussions and the hands on fieldwork on the Shimna River and at Murlough nature reserve, you become aware of the environment around you.

 

To know how the world around you works is a skill you really come to appreciate, how a river flows, how the seas were formed, how some people live in poverty while others live in wealth. Geography doesn’t only help you appreciate your local environment but it also makes other countries familiar to you rather than just being ‘those other people over there,’ which is important in an Integrated school like Shimna.

 

In my first semester studying Archaeology at Queen’s a background in Geography has been very useful, having an understanding of the modern world makes it easier to compare with the world in the past. Just a couple of weeks ago we had a tutorial where we discussed settlement patterns for prehistoric people in Europe and we spend half an hour talking about Christaller’s Central Place Theory which is a Geography topic through and through. It seems that Geography is a relevant subject for whatever you choose to do and if you are starting to make choices for GCSE or A-level it is really worth thinking of Geography as one of your options.

 

 

 

Phillip Crookes 

 

I studied Geography at Shimna College for 7 years, and it is a subject that provided me with many different experiences and topics which I enjoyed. When I started Shimna, back in Year 8, I had a keen interest in Geography but it was not until Year 10 when choosing my GCSE’s that my interest was sparked further by the numerous, exciting topics that I would be able to study at GCSE. The more I studied something in detail, the more interesting it became.

 

As a person who frequently asks “Why?” about many things, I felt Geography was a subject that, in a way, spoke to me as it explained how and why things happened around the world. Geography is a subject that is current, it’s in the present. We look around the world and we see natural disasters happening, governments focusing more and more on cutting CO2 emissions and becoming sustainable, rising and falling birth rates, and even what the weather is like just outside our doors. Geography gives answers to why these things happen, and what exactly these things are. It also helps us understand what is happening in the world and how it is changing.

 

In Year 8, we each were given an EU country to research and then present to the class. As somebody who loves finding out about other cultures, this project appealed to me and opened my eyes as to how different modern day Europe is.

 

At GCSE, the two words that spring to mind are: case study. The case studies allowed us to focus on a particular area of a country or even just a particular country, and understand the environmental processes in the area, or the human factors affecting the area such as its population. Although those two words used to strike fear in me, I now look back on them positively as effective ways of understanding and discovering the world. To this day I can still rhyme off the facts and figures of the Kobe earthquake in Japan.

 

A subject which usually gets classes particularly interested is The Dynamic Earth (Volcanoes & Earthquakes), a topic which we studied at GCSE and went on to study in more detail at A-Level. I think the reason many find this topic so interesting is that it piques people’s curiosity so they want to find out more about natural disasters. Most of us would not have experienced these natural disasters; therefore our A2 class got very excited over this particular topic (as well as studying Curitiba in another topic). We were very keen to start learning about volcanoes and earthquakes in more detail, with most of us citing that topic as the reason for wanting to continue to study Geography.

 

Contact Details
Address: The Lawnfield, King Street, Newcastle, Co Down, BT33 0HD
Telephone: 028 437 26107   Fax: 028 437 26109
E Mail: info@shimna.newcastle.ni.sch.uk

Copyright Shimna Integrated College    |   

Contact Details
Address: The Lawnfield, King Street, Newcastle, Co Down, BT33 0HD
Telephone: 028 437 26107   Fax: 028 437 26109
E Mail: info@shimna.newcastle.ni.sch.uk

Copyright Shimna Integrated College    |